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FX.co ★ Trader Wirtschaftskalender. Internationale Wirtschaftsereignisse

It is impossible to get a clear and balanced picture of the market situation and make a profitable deal without a special tool of fundamental analysis, the Economic Calendar. This is a schedule of significant releases of key economic indicators, events, and news. Every investor needs to keep track of important macroeconomic data, announcements from central banks’ officials, speeches of political leaders, and other events in the financial world. The Economic Calendar indicates the time of data release, its importance, and ability to affect the exchange rates.
Country:
Alle
Australia
Germany
Japan
European Union
United States
United Kingdom
Canada
New Zealand
Switzerland
Italy
Russian Federation
Sweden
France
China
Belgium
Greece
Mexico
Spain
Importance:
Alle
Low
Medium
High
Datum
Ereignis
Aktuell
Prognose
Vorherig
wichtig
Montag, 29 November, 2021
00:30
Company Operating Profits (3 quarter)
-
-
7.1%

Measures the total amount of profits earned by businesses with more than 20 employees before taxes have been taken out.

07:00
Retail Sales (Oct)
-
-
-2.5% m/m;
-0.9% y/y

Gauge for goods sold at retail outlets in the past month. Retail Sales is a leading indicator for the economy since private consumption makes up a large portion of German Gross Domestic Product. Rising consumer spending fuels economic growth, confirms signals from consumer confidence, and may spark inflationary pressures.

The headline figure is expressed as the percentage change from the same month last year.

07:00
Nationwide House Price Index (Nov)
-
-
0.7% m/m;
9.9% y/y

Gauge for costs of homes in the United Kingdom. Mortgage data is used to provide a timely measure of the level of prices. House prices give good information current conditions in the housing market. The Index can precurse broader inflationary pressures felt in later more market moving reports should housing price pressures feed into consumer prices.
 

07:45
Gov Budget Balance (Oct)
-
-
-175.1

The Budget Balance released by MINEFA is the difference between income and expenditure at the end of the budget's period . If the amount is positive then the balance shows a surplus, to the contrary, if it is negative, the balance is in deficit, therefore unveiling borrowing needs. Generally, a surplus is seen as positive (or bullish) for the Euro and a deficit is seen as negative (or bearish).

08:00
CPI (Nov)
-
-
5.4%

Assesses changes in the cost of living by measuring changes in the prices of consumer items. The CPI is the headline inflation figure that indicates the strength of domestic inflationary pressures.

09:00
Unemployment Rate (Oct)
-
-
9.2%

The percentage of individuals in the labor force who are without a job but actively seeking one. A higher Unemployment Rate is generally a drain on the economy. Not only does it mean that resources are not being fully utilized, but it also results in lower consumer spending as there are fewer workers receiving paychecks.

Note: The unemployment rate generally moves slowly, so changes of only a few tenths of a percent are still considered significant. Also note that the unemployment rate does not account for discouraged workers. Therefore, in an economically depressed environment, such as that which occurred in Cold War era East Germany, the Unemployment Rate may not accurately reflect the extent of problems.

09:30
M4 Money Supply (Oct)
-
-
0.6% m/m;
7.0% y/y

M4 is referred to as "broad money" or simply "the money supply". It reflects cash outside banks (i.e. in circulation with the public and non-bank firms) + private-sector retail bank and building society deposits + Private-sector wholesale bank and building society deposits and Certificate of Deposit.

09:30
Mortgage Approvals (Oct)
-
-
72.6K

Number of new mortgages approved for home purchase by BBA-represented banks during the previous month. The BBA represents major banks that make up around 60% of total UK mortgage lending.

09:30
Net Lending to Individuals (Oct)
-
-
9.8

The amount of extra funds that a sector has available to provide for either direct and indirect lending purposes to other similar counter-parts.

13:00
CPI (Nov)
-
-
0.5% m/m;
4.5% y/y

Assesses changes in the cost of living by measuring changes in the prices of consumer items. The CPI is the headline inflation figure that indicates the strength of domestic inflationary pressures. Simply put, inflation reflects a decline in the purchasing power of the Euro in Germany , where each Euro buys fewer goods and services. CPI is the most popular way to measure changes in purchasing power. The report tracks changes in the price of a basket of goods and services that a typical German household might purchase. An increase in the index indicates that it takes more Euros to purchase this same set of basic consumer items.

The German CPI is significant as one of the primary gauges of inflation. As the largest Eurozone economy, inflation in Germany will contribute significantly to inflation in the Eurozone and the behavior of the European Central Bank. High or rising inflation acts as a signal to the ECB to raise interest rates, an action which will result in the strengthening of the Euro. The headline figure for CPI is the percentage change in monthly and annualized percentage term.

13:00
Harmonized CPI (Nov)
-
-
0.5% m/m;
4.6% y/y

The Harmonized Index of Consumer Prices (HICP) reflects changes in the prices of consumer goods and services in a specified period of time. The HICP measures changes of the average price level for goods and services that households consume (the fixed consumer basket). HICP is pure price index. It does not reflect the changes in buying or consumption patterns, brands, and does not reflect the effect of outlet and service provider substitution.

13:30
Current Account (3 quarter)
-
-
3.6

Summarizes the flow of goods and services, income payments, and transfers in and out of Canada. The report acts as a gauge of how Canada's economy interacts with the rest of the world. Where the other side of the Balance of Payments, the Capital and Financial Accounts, deals mainly with financial assets and investments, the Current Account gives a detailed breakdown of how the country intermingles with rest of the global economy on a practical, non-investment basis.

The Current Account tracks the trade balance (exports and imports for goods and services), income payments (such as interest, dividends and salaries) and unilateral transfers (aid, taxes, and one-way gifts). A positive value (current account surplus) indicates that the flow of capital from these components into Canada exceeds capital leaving the country. A negative value (current account deficit) means that there is a net capital outflow from these sources. Persistent Current Account deficits may lead to a natural depreciation of a currency, as trade, income and transfer payments usually reflect Canadian dollars leaving the country to make payments in a foreign currency (just as underlying surpluses act as an appreciating weight).

Canada has historically had an export oriented economy and has relied on exports (particularly oil) as the engine for economic expansion. To this day, trade surpluses form the foundation of Canadian current account surpluses.

There are a number of factors that often work to diminish the impact of the Current Account release on the market. The report is not very timely, released quarterly about two months after the reporting period. Additionally, many of the components that lead to the final Current Account production and trade figures are known well in advance. Lastly, since the report reflects data for a specific reporting quarter, any significant developments in the Current Account should plausibly have been already felt during that quarter and not during the release of data.

But just like GDP and Trade Balance, Current Account is central to forecasting long term developments in foreign exchange rates. It gives a detailed picture of how the Canadian economy interacts internationally, breaking down these interactions into separate components that can be tracked and often anticipated. Thus the Current Account's importance has led it to historically be one of the more important reports out of Canada .

The headline figure is the value of the Current Account denominated in Canadian Dollars.

13:30
Industrial Product Price Index (Oct)
-
-
1.0%

Industrial Product Price Index released by the Statistics Canada measures price changes for major commodities sold by Canadian manufactures. Changes in the IPP index are widely followed as an indicator of commodity inflation.

13:30
Raw Materials Price Index (Oct)
-
-
2.5%

Measures the prices paid by Canadian manufacturers for key raw materials, including resources not produced in Canada. Also known as the Producer Price Index, the RMPI is an early measure of inflation. Although producers may not pass on changes in raw material prices to consumers immediately, the index will record these cost pressures before they reach the end consumer and affect inflation rates. The headline figure is the percentage change in the price index from the previous month and year.

The index includes prices for raw materials like mineral fuels, vegetable products, animal and animal products, wood, ferrous materials, non-ferrous metals, and non-metallic minerals.
 

15:00
Pending Home Sales (Oct)
-
-
-2.3% m/m;
-8.0% y/y

Tracks residential housing contract activity of existing single-family homes. The Pending Home Sales report is an advanced read on trends in the US housing market. Housing is typically correlated to the overall state of the economy; particularly indicative of economic turning points. A sharp drop in housing demand typically acts as a warning signal of economic slowdown as buyers are reluctant to purchase houses when interest rates are high, disposable income is low, or consumer confidence is low. Conversely, a rebound in the housing market is often a leading indicator of an economic recovery.

The report headline is expressed in percentage change in pending home sales from previous month.

23:30
Unemployment Rate (Oct)
-
-
2.8%

The percentage of individuals in the labor force who are without a job but actively seeking one. A higher Unemployment Rate is generally a drain on the economy. Not only does it mean that resources are not being fully utilized, but it also results in lower consumer spending as there are fewer workers receiving paychecks.

Note: The unemployment rate generally moves slowly, so changes of only a few tenths of a percent are still considered significant. Also note that the unemployment rate does not account for discouraged workers. Therefore, in an economically depressed environment, such as that which occurred in Cold War era East Germany, the Unemployment Rate may not accurately reflect the extent of problems.

23:50
Industrial Production (Oct)
-
-
-5.4% m/m;
-2.3% y/y

Measures the per volume change in output from mining, quarrying, manufacturing, energy and construction sectors in Japan. Industrial production is significant as a short-term indicator of the strength of Japanese industrial activity. High or rising Industrial Production figures suggest increased production and economic expansion. However, uncontrolled levels of production and consumption can spark inflation.

The report is only a preliminary estimate figure that does not move the markets much. The figure is released in headlines as a monthly percent change.

23:50
Retail Sales (Oct)
-
-
2.7% m/m;
-0.6% y/y

Gauge for goods sold at retail outlets in the past month. Retail Sales is a leading indicator for the economy. Rising consumer spending fuels economic growth, confirms signals from consumer confidence, and may spark inflationary pressures.

The headline figure is expressed as the percentage change from the same month last year.